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Grim Joggers
by Chris Thompson on Friday 28th Jan 2011

The first case of unhealthy running?

When you think of jogging, you don’t always think of running and jumping over objects that could quite easily kill you. Avoiding being vaporised by barrels of TNT and falling down pits are not normally a feature of a morning jog around the park; unless you’re playing Grim Joggers, that is.

Grim Joggers is just that: Grim, but in a good way. The type of game will be familiar to all; it spreads multiple platforms, from console to flash games. One of the more notable existing iPhone games is Canabalt, offering a simplistic but highly addictive formula of jumping over objects and trying not to fall down great heights inconveniently placed in your way. Very similar, but not exactly, what Grim Joggers is all about.

This existing formula has been given a new lease of life by the developer 10tons, they took it and added more people into the running, literally. Instead of trying to traverse a level with one life, they ever so kindly, give you a total of 16 lives to use per run. The only thing is; you have to use them all at once in conga line style survival running game, making it so much harder to not accidentally loose one of your followers into a stray set of spikes, or jump too early and loose quite a portion of your followers down a canyon.

 

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Hard and addictive fun is what this game brings to the table; it’s up there with the greats of casual gaming. You can sit there and play several runs on this game, trying to beat scores and get higher up in the leaderbord or you can fill a gap in your busy lifestyle, this game is flexible and has almost limitless appeal to those who like testing how quick their thumbs really are, and how much luck is on their side.

It’s not only a great game, but it’s a perfect homage to those old retro games – back when the gaming was new and existed in fancy things called “Arcade Cabinets”. Fundamentally, it is an arcade game, the typical looking graphics mixed with the catchy music and simplistic controls send you right back to that era. When I say simplistic controls, I mean you only need one thumb to play this game, one tap to jump and a double tap makes you double jump – as easy as pie!

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Accessibility and longevity is the bulk of this games arsenal, It’s something everyone could, and can, enjoy – not that you would really want to expose your children to levels of gore and the slow motion death that the last runner has. It has multiple maps to run on, three in total at the moment. Although, I’m reliably informed that there is work on an update that will bring it up to a sum total of four maps with more unique obstacles. You may be wondering how you can have only four maps and longevity working together, the answer is simple: randomising the level lay out. This gives you a fresh level every time you hit the play button.

There is a small problem I have noticed with this game; a small overlook with the randomising mechanic on each level. Sometimes, fortunately it’s not that often, you get a high path and a low path, which both have traps on them. This means you have to jump to avoid them. However, the way its set out means its physically imposable to jump over both of the traps so you’ll lose one of your joggers with whatever happens. It’s only small though and because of the nature of the game you hardly notice it as much as you would in Canabalt. I personally find it more of a challenge of the game.

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For a small game like this, it’s quite impressive that you can get so much from it. The ability to pull you back for more is quite outstanding and the only problem that I found with the game is easily over looked. The sound and graphics are great; this game really excels in all areas, adding a great twist to an established genre.

metacritic

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  • Sound: 10
  • Graphics: 10
  • Gameplay: 9
  • Longevity: 10

10

Perfect


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